Answers to Common Gynecologic Health Questions

Premier Physician Network doctors answer frequently asked questions about gynecologic health.

What are uterine fibroid tumors, and how can women know they might have them?

Uterine fibroids are muscular tumors the grow in the wall of the uterus, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Fibroids are the most common noncancerous tumors found in women of childbearing ages, according to the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOff Site Icon (CDC).

Symptoms that might let a woman know she has uterine fibroids, according to the CDC, include:

  • Bleeding in between periods
  • Heavy and painful periods
  • Lower back pain
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Reproductive problems such as difficulty getting pregnant, multiple miscarriages, and pre-term labor
  • Urinating often

For more information about uterine fibroids, talk with your doctor.

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Are there specific risk factors that predispose women to fibroids?

There are a variety of risk factors that could cause a woman to be predisposed to have fibroids. According to the U.S. Department of Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS), including:

  • Age: Fibroids are more common as women age, especially as women go through their 30s and 40s though the time they start menopause
  • Eating habits: Eating a lot of ham and red meat is linked with having a higher risk of fibroids. Eating green vegetables can help women prevent fibroids
  • Ethnicity: Black women are more likely to develop fibroids than other women
  • Family history: If fibroids run in your family, you are at a higher risk of developing them also. A woman whose mother had fibroids is at three times higher risk of developing them
  • Obesity: Being overweight puts women at two to three times higher risk of having fibroids

For more information about risk factors of uterine fibroids, talk with your doctor.

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How are fibroids usually diagnosed?

Fibroids can be diagnosed via a gynecological exam or by using imaging tests, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH). Those tests include an ultrasound, MRI, X-rays and Cat scan (CT).

If you are found to have fibroids, you might need surgery to remove or you may also need surgery to determine if you actually have fibroids, including laparoscopy and hysteroscopy, according to the NIH. Most fibroids are non-cancerous.

For more information about how uterine fibroids are diagnosed, talk with your doctor.

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What treatments are available for uterine fibroids?

Some fibroids need to be removed to avoid other health problems, according to the U.S. Department of Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Treatments for fibroids, according to the HHS, include:

  • Endometrial ablation
  • Hysterectomy
  • Medication
  • MRI-guided ultrasound surgery
  • Myomectomy
  • Myolysis
  • Uterine fibroid embolization

In the past, hysterectomy was the most common solution to take care of uterine fibroids, according to the HHS. While it is the only way to completely cure uterine fibroids and ensure they don’t return, the other less invasive treatments have proven to be an effective solution for many women.

Talk to your physician for more information treatment options for uterine fibroids.

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What is the hormone cortisol, and how does an imbalance affect women?

Cortisol is a hormone frequently known as the stress hormone, according to the American Osteopathic AssociationOff Site Icon (AOA).

When people become stressed, the body reacts by producing and releasing cortisol, according to the AOA. Studies have shown that if you have a chronic imbalance of cortisol, the increased levels can put you at risk for health issues, including:

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Difficulty recovering from exercise
  • Digestive problems
  • Fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Irritability
  • Low libido
  • Memory problems
  • Sleeping issues
  • Weight gain

Not all cortisol is bad. It is normal for cortisol levels to increase slightly in the morning as you get revved up for the day, but they should lower as the day goes on, according to the AOA.

For more information about cortisol and the effects of an imbalance, talk with your doctor.

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What role does estrogen play in a woman’s well-being?

Estrogen is the primary female hormone, according to the North American Menopause SocietyOff Site Icon (NAMS).

Estrogen promotes the health of a woman’s reproductive organs, and it helps the vagina stay moist, elastic and well-supplied with blood, according to the NAMS.

Additionally, estrogen serves as a stimulant for the growth of breast tissue, causes the uterine lining to thicken during the menstrual cycle, and protects bones, according to the NAMS.

This protection of the bones is especially important for women after their bone density plateaus in their 30s, according to Premier Physician Network’ physicians.

Estrogen helps to maintain the bones until menopause causes changes.

Talk to your physician for more information about estrogen and what it does for a woman’s body.

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How is a woman’s hormonal state different if one or both ovaries are removed?

By removing the ovaries, you are removing the production centers for estrogen and progesterone, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

If only one ovary is removed, the remaining ovary will compensate for the one that was removed, according to PPN physicians. In most cases, women who have only one ovary still have normal menstrual cycles, can still become pregnant, and do not experience any symptoms of hormonal changes.

If both of the ovaries are removed during a hysterectomy, a woman will immediately experience menopause, according to the American College of Obstetricians and GynecologistsOff Site Icon (ACOG).

Menopause occurs because without any ovaries, the body no longer has estrogen or progesterone. Menopause can cause symptoms including hot flashes, moodiness, slowed metabolism, and vaginal dryness, according to the ACOG.

For more information about what happens to a woman’s hormonal state when one or both ovaries are removed, talk with your doctor.

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What are a woman’s hormone options when she experiences a surgical menopause?

Surgical menopause is menopause that didn’t occur naturally, but rather, was induced by having the ovaries removed, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

There also are a variety of ways to treat menopause symptoms, according to the NIH. Those include:

  • Diet and lifestyle changes
  • Hormone therapy
  • Hormone therapy alternatives, including antidepressants, blood pressure medication, and hot flash-reducing medication

Women who choose hormone therapy have a variety of options for receiving the replacement hormones after surgical menopause, include taking them orally or vaginally, or using topical or vaginal sprays, creams, or gels, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

Talk to your physician for more information about hormone options after surgical menopause.

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What is cervical dysplasia, how is it found, and does it always lead to cervical cancer?

Cervical dysplasia is an abnormal change in cells around the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that opens at the top of the vagina, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

The changes in these cells are not cancer, but they can lead to cancer if they are not treated, according to the NIH.

Cervical dysplasia is found by having a pelvic exam that includes a Pap smear, according to the NIH. If the Pap smear shows abnormal cells or cervical dysplasia, you will need additional testing, which could include a follow up Pap smear or a biopsy.

Talk to your doctor for more information about cervical dysplasia.

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What is HPV, and how is it related to cervical dysplasia?

Human papillomavirus – commonly known as HPV – is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOff Site Icon (CDC).

There are more than 100 kinds of HPV, most of them are harmless, according the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH). But, about 30 can cause cervical dysplasia – changes to cells on the surface of the uterus that can be a sign of cancer.

The best way to prevent HPV is to get the HPV vaccine, according to the NIH. If girls get the vaccine before becoming sexually active, they reduce their chances of getting cervical cancer.

The vaccine is recommended for girls and women ages 11 through 26, and boys and men ages 11 through 21. It is given in three doses over a six month period, according to the CDC.

For people who are sexually active, using condoms from start to finish of every sex act can help lower the risk of HPV, but they do not fully protect against it, according to the CDC.

For more information about HPV and how to prevent it, talk with your doctor.

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Does either HPV or cervical dysplasia have symptoms?

Most of the time there are no symptoms when someone has cervical dysplasia, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

HPV also does not have symptoms in most cases, and in 90 percent of cases, your immune system will clear up the HPV within two years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOff Site Icon (CDC).

The problem is, there is no way to know whether the HPV you have will clear up on it’s on or turn into another health issue, such as cancer, according to the CDC.

In some cases, the type of HPV will cause genital warts. In very rare cases, those warts can also spread to the throat.

For more information about symptoms of HPV and cervical dysplasia, talk with your doctor.

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What steps can women take to reduce the risk of these conditions?

The best way to prevent HPV is to get the HPV vaccine, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH). If girls get the vaccine before becoming sexually active, they reduce their chances of getting cervical cancer.

The vaccine is recommended for girls and women ages 11 through 26, and boys and men ages 11 through 21. It is given in three doses over a six month period, according to the Centers for Disease Control and PreventionOff Site Icon (CDC).

For people who are sexually active, using condoms from start to finish of every sex act can help lower the risk of HPV, but they do not fully protect against it, according to the CDC.

Because HPV is the most common cause of cervical dysplasia, getting the HPV vaccine also will help prevent cervical dysplasia. The risk of cervical dysplasia also can be decreased, according to the NIH, by:

  • Not having a baby before age 16
  • Not having multiple sexual partners
  • Not having sex before age 18
  • Not smoking

For more information about HPV and cervical dysplasia, and how to prevent them, talk with your doctor.

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How often do I need to have a Pap smear?

How often you need to get a Pap smear done depends on your age, according to the American Cancer SocietyOff Site Icon (ACS).

For women younger between 21 and 30, being screened by a Pap smear every three years is safe and decreases the number of false positives there had been when Pap smears used to be recommended annually, according to the ACS.

Once a woman turns 30, the ACS recommends she have both and HPV test and Pap smear because having both tests does an even better job at decreasing the risk of cancer. If both test results are normal, they can be repeated every five years.

Women 65 and older who have been screened on a regular basis or who have had a hysterectomy for non-cancerous reasons do not need to continue getting screened, according to the ACS.

For more information about the how often to have a Pap smear, talk with your doctor.

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Are there factors that increase a woman’s risk for incontinence?

Physician Assistant Elyse Weber discusses factors that can increase a woman’s risk for incontinence. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

There are a variety of factors that can increase your risk for urinary incontinence, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon(OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon(HHS).

Women are twice as likely as men to experience urinary incontinence. Some factors that affect only women make it more likely we will have urinary incontinence, according to the OWH. Those include:

  • Childbirth – After giving birth, many of us leak because labor and vaginal birth weaken our pelvic floor support and damage nerves that control the bladder.
  • Menopause – For some women, bladder control problems start after they stop having periods. Our bodies stop making estrogen, which some experts believe weakens urethral tissue
  • Pregnancy – Growing babies push against our bladders, urethras, and pelvic floor muscles. The pressure can weaken our pelvic floor support, which leads to bladder leakage.

Other factors that can lead to urinary incontinence in both women and men, according to the OWH, include:

  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Constipation
  • Excess weight
  • Infection
  • Medicines
  • Nerve damage

For more information about factors that can cause an increased risk of urinary incontinence in women, talk with your doctor.

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What symptoms should be signals to a woman that she needs to talk to her doctor about incontinence?

Physician Assistant Elyse Weber discusses symptoms that should signal a woman to talk to her doctor about incontinence. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

For women experiencing urinary incontinence problems, it’s important that we talk to our doctor to find a solution. Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women, and your physician can work with you to find a diagnosis and to decide what steps you can take to make improvements

Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians say that everyone can leak now and again. But, if you find yourself leaking enough that it makes you uncomfortable or interferes with your life, you should talk to your doctor.

The Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS), says your doctor will talk about your symptoms and also take a medical history, including:

  • How much you leak
  • How often you go to the bathroom to urinate
  • How often you leak
  • When you leak

Your doctor will also do a physical exam, and will probably ask you to keep a record of these specifics for about a week. This bladder journal will help your doctor determine next steps when it comes to combating urinary incontinence.

For more information about symptoms of urinary incontinence, talk with your doctor.

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Is female incontinence curable?

Physician Assistant Elyse Weber discusses whether female incontinence is curable. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians say female incontinence might not be totally curable, but it can be treated and improved. 

Your doctor can help you decide what steps are best for you to take to treat your level of urinary incontinence.

The National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH) says there are a variety of treatments, including:

  • Bladder training: By changing your urination habits, you can decrease incidents of urinary incontinence. 
  • Bulking agents: Collagen and carbon beads can be injected near your urinary sphincter to treat urinary incontinence. 
  • Lifestyle changes: These could include drinking more water, consuming less caffeine, consuming less diet soda, drinking less late in the day, limiting alcohol, quitting smoking, managing constipation, and exercising. 
  • Medical devices: A pessary is another device. It’s a stiff ring inserted into your vagina. It provides pressure against the vaginal wall to help reposition the urethra, causing less leakage. 
  • Pelvic floor muscle exercise: Known as Kegel exercises, these require you to practice tightening and relaxing the muscles that control your urine flow. 
  • Surgery: A few surgical options are available for treating urinary incontinence, including retropubic suspension and sling. During a retropubic suspension the doctor performs a procedure to raise the bladder neck or urethra to limit leaks. A sling procedure attaches an internal sling to cradle the bladder neck or urethra to limit leaks. 

Your doctor will also do a physical exam, and will probably ask you to keep a record of these specifics for about a week. This bladder journal will help your doctor determine next steps when it comes to combating urinary incontinence.

For more information about whether urinary incontinence is curable, talk with your doctor. 

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What is InterStim®?

Dr. Rettig discusses what InterStim is. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

InterStim is a device your doctor can surgically implant to help treat urinary incontinence.

According to the MedtronicOff Site Icon company website, InterStim targets the nerves that control your bladder to help it function normally, without consistent leaks.

The system sends small electrical impulses to the nerves to allow your brain to communicate better with your bladder, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians. This helps control leaks.

For more information about InterStim, talk with your doctor.

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Who is the ideal candidate for InterStim®?

Dr. Rettig discusses who makes an ideal candidate for InterStim. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

The InterStim system might be a good option for you if you have already tried other types of medical treatment for your urinary incontinence, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

The system can be a useful therapy for urinary incontinence that is caused by a variety of issues, including urge incontinency, frequency, urgency, and non-obstructive urinary retention, according to PPN physicians.

For more information about who is a good candidate for InterStim, talk to your doctor.

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How can the use of InterStim® affect a woman’s quality of life?

Dr. Rettig discusses how InterStim can affect a woman’s quality of life. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

The InterStim implant typically helps women have an about 80 percent reduction in symptoms of urinary incontinence, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

The physicians say it can help make the difference, for example, from you having three or four urinary incontinence issues each day to having three to four per week.

For more information about how InterStim can affect a woman’s quality of life, talk with your doctor.

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How does menopause affect a woman’s ability to be intimate with her partner?

During menopause, women experience a mix of both physical and emotional changes.

For some women, physical changes from menopause including vaginal dryness and hot flashes can make intimacy seem less exciting, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

For other women, emotional changes such as mood swings and decreased libido can interfere with intimacy.

Whatever the reason, it’s important for women to find a way to work through the challenges menopause can cause, should they want to.

For more information about how menopause can affect a woman’s ability to be intimate, talk with your doctor.

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What is a good way for a woman to start the conversation with her health care provider about menopause and intimacy?

The best way to start a conversation with your physician about menopause and its effect on intimacy is to be honest, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians.

Though it can seem like a delicate subject to some people and might feel uncomfortable to talk about at first, it’s important to be honest with your doctor.

If you have a physical issue, such as vaginal dryness, it’s important to be clear and tell your doctor the issue so he or she can work with you to find a solution.

If it’s a matter of decreased desire, you could tell your doctor you’re not as interested in intimacy as you used to be and need help to find out why. Your doctor will be happy to work with you to find a solution that meets your personal needs.

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What are steps a woman can take to address menopause and intimacy issues?

If you’re facing intimacy issues related to menopause, there are steps you can take to improve the problem.

Treatment needs are different for every woman, but major improvements can be made with minor changes, according to Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians. Some of those changes include:

  • Adding new medications
  • Changing ongoing medications
  • Changing your schedule
  • Decreasing stress
  • Using moisturizers

Being honest with your partner, compromising on how and when to be intimate, and experimenting with new positions and sensual activities are all also ways to help work through intimacy issues related to menopause, according to Harvard Medical SchoolOff Site Icon (HMS).

Talk to your doctor for more information about what steps you can take to address intimacy issues during menopause.

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What is a vaginal yeast infection?

A vaginal yeast infection is an infection of your vagina. It is caused by an overgrowth of the fungus Candida, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Your vulva and the area around your vulva will itch and burn when you have a yeast infection.

Most women get at least one vaginal yeast infection some time in their life. Women and girls can get this type of infection at any age.

Talk to your health care provider for more information about vaginal yeast infections.

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Are some women at higher risk for yeast infections?

Even though any girl or woman can get a vaginal yeast infection, some of us are at higher risk than others. 

According to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS), you are at higher risk for a vaginal yeast infection if you: 

  • Are pregnant
  • Douche
  • Have diabetes
  • Have a weakened immune system
  • Took antibiotics recently
  • Use hormonal birth control that has higher doses of estrogen
  • Use vaginal sprays

Talk to your health care provider for more information about why some women are at higher risk for yeast infections.

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What are the symptoms of a yeast infection?

Extreme itching around your vagina is the most common symptom of a vaginal yeast infection, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Other symptoms could include:

  • Burning vagina and vulva
  • Painful sex
  • Pain while urinating
  • Redness of the vagina and vulva
  • Soreness
  • Swelling of the vagina and vulva
  • Thick, white vaginal discharge that looks like cottage cheese but does not smell bad
  • Your symptoms could be anywhere from mild to severe and differ each time you have a vaginal yeast infection.
  • Talk to your health care provider for more information about symptoms of vaginal yeast infections.

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How is a yeast infection treated?

You can treat a vaginal yeast infection with an antifungal medicine, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH), an office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Though you can buy over-the-counter antifungal medicine to treat a yeast infection, you should visit your doctor first to make sure you have a yeast infection and not a different kind of infection.

The over-the counter medicine comes as a cream, tablets, ointment or suppositories to put in your vagina. The can be used for between one and seven days, depending on the type you choose to buy.

Your doctor might also recommend a medicine you take by mouth, especially if the over-the-counter treatment doesn’t work or if you have frequent vaginal yeast infections.

Talk to your health care provider for more information about treating vaginal yeast infections.

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Can yeast infection symptoms be a sign of something else?

Sometimes, it can seem like you have a yeast infection, but the symptoms are actually a sign of something else.

What looks like a yeast infection could be a sign of a different kind of infection, Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians say.

It could be a different infection called vaginitis or something more serious like herpes. Because it can be difficult to tell the difference at first, it’s important to visit your health care provider to find the best treatment option for you.

Talk to your provider for more information about whether yeast infection symptoms can be a sign of something else.

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At what age do girls typically get their first period?

Certified Nurse Midwife Jalana Lazar discusses the age at which girls typically get their first period. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

Most girls get their period between ages 12 and 14, but it can happen years earlier or later, according to the American College of Obstetricians and GynecologistsOff Site Icon (ACOG).

Some girls get their first period as young as 9 or as old as 15 or 16, Premier Physician Network (PPN) providers say.

For most girls, their period starts about two years after they first start to grow breasts, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

For more information about when girls typically get their first period, talk to your doctor.

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How old should my daughter be when I talk to her about her period?

Certified Nurse Midwife Jalana Lazar discusses how old your daughter should be when you talk to her about her period. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

It’s good to start talking to your daughter about her period and other body changes she can expect during puberty before she experiences them.

Once you start to notice some physical changes, such as body odor, hair in her armpits or pubic area, it can be a good time to have a conversation about her period, Premier Physician Network (PPN) providers say.

Make sure to talk to your daughter about her period by the time she starts growing breast buds, because she will likely start her period within two years after that.

Talk to your doctor for more information about when to talk to your daughter about her period.

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What are steps I can take to help my daughter prepare for her first period?

Certified Nurse Midwife Jalana Lazar discusses how to help your daughter prepare for her first period. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

You can help your daughter prepare to have her first period by talking to her about what she can expect to happen with her body and also talking about your own experiences.

After you talk to her about what to expect when her period comes, take her to buy products she’ll need, including menstrual pads and tampons, Premier Physician Network (PPN) providers say.

Even if she is going to start with pads and not use tampons right away, having them can help her understand and feel comfortable with them.

Once she has pads, she can tuck some in her backpack in a discreet place so she can be prepared in case her first period comes while she is at school.

Without worrying her, also talk to your daughter about menstrual cramps, feelings of tiredness, and mood swings. Help her to understand that these are normal changes that can come along with a period, but don’t affect everyone the same way.

It’s important also to let her know that she will have a clear or white vaginal discharge for months before her first period comes, which is normal and nothing to worry about, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

Menstrual cycle hygiene – including how often to bathe and how often to change tampons and pads – is another important topic. It’s good to talk about before your daughter gets her period, but she’ll probably need gentle reminders after her period comes.

And, make sure she knows that having her period shouldn’t keep her from being active and doing the things she loves. She’ll still be able to participate in team sports, gym class, swimming, gymnastics and anything else she enjoys.

For more information about how to help your daughter prepare for her first period, talk with your doctor.

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At what age should a girl start to see an OB-Gyn provider?

Certified Nurse Midwife Jalana Lazar discusses the age a girl should start seeing an OB-Gyn provider. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Though girls typically start their first period between 9 and 16, it’s not necessary for them to regularly start visiting an OB-Gyn provider for their gynecologic health until they turn 21.

Guidelines now recommend that women get their first Pap smear at 21, which makes it a good time to start regular OB-Gyn visits, Premier Physician Network (PPN) providers say.

However, if a girl has periods that become irregular, heavy, painful, or isn’t having periods at all, it’s a good idea to plan an OB-Gyn visit earlier.

For more information about when a girl should start seeing an OB-Gyn provider, talk with your doctor.

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What is polycystic ovary syndrome?

Dr. Ruby Shrestha discusses polycystic ovary syndrome. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common health problem for many women, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH). 

PCOS is caused by an imbalance of reproductive hormones, which causes problems in your ovaries. 

Typically, your ovaries make the egg that is released each month as part of your menstrual cycle. But with PCOS, the egg doesn’t develop like it should or isn’t released as it should be. 

PCOS can cause missed or irregular periods, which can lead to infertility.

For more information about PCOS, talk to your doctor.

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Who is at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome?

Dr. Ruby Shrestha discusses who is at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is caused by genetic and environmental factors, Premier Physician Network (PPN) physicians say.

Having a family history of PCOS could increase your risk for the condition.

Being obese also increases your risk of PCOS.

Talk to your doctor for more information about who is at risk for polycystic ovary syndrome.

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How is polycystic ovary syndrome treated?

Dr. Ruby Shrestha discusses how polycystic ovary syndrome is treated. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) doesn’t have a cure, but the symptoms of the condition can be treated, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human ServicesOff Site Icon (HHS).

For example:

  • Birth control pills – Taking these can help you have a regular period, reduce male hormones, and clear acne.
  • Weight loss – Diet and exercise can help you lose weight, which can help improve and even eliminate the symptoms of PCOS over time, Premier Physician NetworkOff Site Icon (PPN) physicians say.

For more information about how PCOS is treated, talk with your doctor.

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Can you get pregnant if you have polycystic ovary syndrome?

Dr. Ruby Shrestha discusses whether you can get pregnant if you have polycystic ovary syndrome. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common causes of infertility in women, according to the Office on Women’s HealthOff Site Icon (OWH).

Though it might be harder to get pregnant if you have PCOS, it is still possible to get pregnant when you ovulate, either spontaneously or with the help of medication.

For more information about getting pregnant when you have PCOS, talk with your doctor.

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Thanks to Premier Physician Network doctors for answering these common questions about gynecologic health:

Additional Resources

This website provides general medical information that should be used for informative and educational purposes only. Information found here should not be used as a substitute for the personal, professional medical advice of your physician. Do not begin any course of treatment without consulting a physician

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