Answers to Common Urology Questions

Premier Physician Network’s doctors answer frequently asked questions about urology.

Are there medical conditions or procedures that cause urinary incontinence for men?

Dr. Gaker discusses medical conditions or procedures that cause urinary incontinence in men. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

There are some medical conditions that can cause urinary incontinence in men, including diabetes and an enlarged prostate, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

Researchers suspect that microvascular damage caused by diabetes is what leads to urinary incontinence for some people, according to the American Diabetes AssociationOff Site Icon (ADA).

Also in men, some kinds of prostate surgery and other surgeries in the pelvis can cause urinary incontinence, according to the NIH.

In addition, other conditions and life events that can cause urinary incontinence in men, according to the NIH, include:

  • Age – Bladder muscles can get weaker as men age. This leads to decreased bladder capacity to store urine.
  • Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) – With this condition, the prostate becomes enlarged but is not cancerous. The enlarged prostate can press against and pinch the urethra. This can eventually lead to incomplete bladder emptying and urinary incontinence.
  • Chronic coughing – An ongoing cough can increase pressure on the bladder and the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Obesity – Excess weight puts pressure on the bladder, which increases the need to urinate even when the bladder is not yet full.
  • Physical inactivity – Decreased activity can increase a body weight, which can lead to muscle weakness.

For more about conditions and procedures that can increase a man’s risk of urinary incontinence, talk with your doctor.

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How is urinary incontinence treated in men?

Dr. Gaker discusses treatment for urinary incontinence in men. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

The way urinary incontinence in men is treated depends on the type of urinary incontinence the man is affected by, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

The first steps health care providers typically recommend, according to the NIH, include:

  • Behavioral changes
  • Bladder training
  • Lifestyle changes
  • Pelvic floor exercises
  • Urgency suppression

If these steps are tried and don’t work, your physician might recommend some of the following options to treat your urinary incontinence, according to the NIH:

  • Bulking agents
  • Electrical nerve stimulation
  • Medications
  • Surgery

For more information about treating urinary incontinence in men, talk with your physician.

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Can urinary incontinence be a symptom of an underlying health issue in men?

Dr. Gaker discusses urinary incontinence as a symptom of an underlying health in men. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

The way urinary incontinence in men is treated depends on the type of urinary incontinence the man is affected by, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH).

Urinary incontinence is a symptom of a number of health issues, and Premier Physician Network’s (PPN) physicians recommend visiting a urologist to find a cause if you start leaking urine.

Some health issues urinary incontinence can be a symptom of, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon (NIH), include:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Diabetes
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Overactive bladder
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Prostate cancer
  • Stroke

Talk to your doctor to learn more about men’s health issues of which urinary incontinence can be a symptom.

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What is a urinary tract infection?

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection in your urinary tract, which includes the bladder, kidneys and urethra, according to the American Academy of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon (AAFP).

Talk to your doctor for more information about urinary tract infections.

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What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection?

There are a variety of symptoms that you can have with a urinary tract infection (UTI), according to the American Academy of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon (AAFP).

UTI symptoms could include:

  • Burning or pain when you urinate
  • Cloudy, dark, bloody, smelly urine
  • Feeling the need to urinate more often than usual
  • Having the urge to urinate but not being able to
  • Leaking small amounts of urine

For more information about symptoms of a urinary tract infection, talk with your doctor.

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What puts you at a higher risk for developing a urinary tract infection?

Women are at higher risk of developing a urinary tract infection (UTI) than men, according to the American Academy of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon (AAFP). This is because women have a shorter urethra, making it easier for bacteria to reach the bladder. 

Sexual intercourse can also cause a UTI, especially in women, because bacteria can easily be pushed into the urethra. 

The risk of UTIs also increases in women who use a diaphragm, because the diaphragm makes it harder for the bladder to empty, which makes it more likely for bacteria to cause infections. 

Talk to your doctor for more information about who is at higher risk for developing a urinary tract infection. 

For more information about symptoms of a urinary tract infection, talk with your doctor.

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What can you do to reduce your risk for a urinary tract infection?

You can take a variety of steps to reduce your risk of getting a urinary tract infection (UTI), according to the American Academy of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon (AAFP).

Those steps include:

  • Avoid bubble baths
  • Avoid using a diaphragm as birth control if you get UTIs frequently
  • Don’t hold your urine
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Urinate after having sexual intercourse
  • Use plenty of lubrication during sexual intercourse
  • Wash foreskin regularly if you are uncircumcised
  • Wear loose-fitting clothing, including underwear
  • Wipe from front to back after a bowel movement

For more information about reducing your risk of a urinary tract infection, talk with your doctor.

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Thanks to Premier Physician Network’s doctors for answering these common questions about urology:

Additional Resources

This website provides general medical information that should be used for informative and educational purposes only. Information found here should not be used as a substitute for the personal, professional medical advice of your physician. Do not begin any course of treatment without consulting a physician.

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